The people’s champion is born

Muhammad Ali

Throwing+a+punch+at+Ernie+Terrell%2C+Muhammad+Ali+fights+in+one+of+the+56+matches+that+he+won.+Muhammad+Ali+is+an+all-time+great+in+the+sport+of+boxing%2C+as+well+as+in+the+fight+against+racism.+%0A
Back to Article
Back to Article

The people’s champion is born

Throwing a punch at Ernie Terrell, Muhammad Ali fights in one of the 56 matches that he won. Muhammad Ali is an all-time great in the sport of boxing, as well as in the fight against racism.

Throwing a punch at Ernie Terrell, Muhammad Ali fights in one of the 56 matches that he won. Muhammad Ali is an all-time great in the sport of boxing, as well as in the fight against racism.

Flickr.com

Throwing a punch at Ernie Terrell, Muhammad Ali fights in one of the 56 matches that he won. Muhammad Ali is an all-time great in the sport of boxing, as well as in the fight against racism.

Flickr.com

Flickr.com

Throwing a punch at Ernie Terrell, Muhammad Ali fights in one of the 56 matches that he won. Muhammad Ali is an all-time great in the sport of boxing, as well as in the fight against racism.

Robbie Cicciari, Co Editor-in-Chief

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Widely known as one of the greatest boxers of all-time, Cassius Marcellus Clay,  Jr. was born on January 17, 1942. Better known as Muhammad Ali, the boxer was born and raised  in Louisville, Kentucky, where he began boxing at the age of 12. Just six years following his entry into the sport, Clay represented the United States in the 1960 Rome Summer Olympics. There he won the gold medal in the light heavyweight division and put himself on the map.

 Later that year he turned professional, prior to his well known conversion to Islam in 1961. Then three years later at the age of 22, Clay won his first major fight in a gigantic upset of Sonny Liston, capturing the world heavyweight championship.

 Following this fight is when he changed his name to Muhammad Ali, starting the phase of his life where he empowered the “counterculture generation.” Ali had often called his birth name his “slave name,” which eventually led to him to change his name. He was then known for his active voice in the Civil Rights Movement and resisting white dominance during this time. In 1966, he continued this resistance by evading the draft and refusing to fight in the Vietnam War. He was arrested for draft evasion and found guilty, resulting in his boxing titles being stripped and missing out on four years of his fighting career. However, in 1971 Supreme Court overturned his conviction.

 The peak of his career followed his release from jail. He holds multiple records including beating 21 boxers for the world heavyweight title, as well as winning 14 unified title bouts. He was also the only three-time lineal champion of the division. He ended his career with a whopping record of 56-5, including 37 wins by knockout, and no one knows how much higher that total could have been if he fought for those extra four years during his prime. Senior Dylan Gilmore added, “If he was able to box during this time, I think he would’ve had at least ten  more wins. Also he would probably have less losses; those years would’ve been the peak of his career.”

 Ali retired from boxing in 1981 at the age of 39. Following his retirement,  he focused mainly on his religion and charity. In 1984, he was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Syndrome, which many attribute to boxing-related injuries. However, Ali and his physician both discredit that it was due to boxing. As he got older,  his condition worsened slowly until his death on June 3 2016 in Scottsdale, Arizona. He was an icon to many and was able to impact the world both through sports as well as socially. Ali will always be a legend and known as one of the greatest boxers of all-time.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email